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Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: MedlinePlus Genetic

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a condition that causes episodes of extreme muscle weakness or paralysis, usually beginning in infancy or early childhood. Most often, these episodes involve a temporary inability to move muscles in the arms and legs Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP or HyperKPP) is a type of periodic paralysis in which the patient has attacks that are triggered by having too much potassium in their blood. Blood potassium levels can sometimes rise during attacks, too. Hyper means that there is a high amount of something, and kalemic refers to potassium Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is characterized by attacks of flaccid limb weakness (which may also include weakness of the muscles of the eyes, throat, and trunk), hyperkalemia (serum potassium concentration >5 mmol/L) or an increase of serum potassium concentration of at least 1.5 mmol/L during an attack of weakness and/or provoking/worsening of an attack by oral potassium intake, normal serum potassium between attacks, and onset before age 20 years Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyPP) is a dominantly inherited disorder of muscle in quarter horses, American paint horses, Appaloosas, and quarter horse crossbred animals that causes episodes of tremors, myotonia, weakness, or paralysis in association with elevated serum potassium (Naylor, 1997; Spier et al., 1990)

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysi

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HyperKPP) is a rare inherited muscle disorder which causes episodes of paralysis or weakness. It's estimated to occur in only one of 250,000 individuals, though since it is inherited there may be several patients in a single family. It was only recognized as a separate disorder in 1955 Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP, HyperKPP) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder that affects sodium channels in muscle cells and the ability to regulate potassium levels in the blood Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is characterized by episodes of muscle paralysis associated with a fall in blood potassium levels (hypokalemia). Episodes typically involve a temporary inability to move muscles in the arms and legs. The first attack usually occurs in childhood or adolescence What is hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP)? HyperKPP is one of a group of diseases, called inherited myopathies, that causes problems with the tone and contraction of skeletal muscles. As in all forms of periodic paralysis, episodes of weakness in hyperKPP are caused by a temporary loss of muscle excitability

Periodic paralyses (PPs) are rare neuromuscular disorders caused by mutations in skeletal muscle sodium, calcium, and potassium channel genes. PPs include hypokalemic paralysis, hyperkalemic paralysis, and Andersen-Tawil syndrome HYPP is characterized by muscle tremors, weakness, paralysis, and collapse. Attacks are sporadic and can be accompanied by loud breathing due to paralysis of airway muscles. Sudden death can occur due to heart failure or respiratory muscle paralysis Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is a disorder that causes occasional episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes a higher than normal level of potassium in the blood. The medical name for high potassium level is hyperkalemia Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is an inherited disease of the muscles primarily found in Quarter Horses which is characterized by sporadic episodes of muscle tremors or paralysis. Phenotype: Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is characterized by sporadic attacks of muscle tremors (shaking or trembling), weakness, and/or collapse

Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis - Conditions

  1. Gamstorp disease is an extremely rare genetic condition that causes you to have episodes of muscle weakness or temporary paralysis. The disease is known by many names, including hyperkalemic..
  2. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is an inher-ited disease that leads to uncontrolled muscle twitch-ing or profound muscle weakness, and in severe cases, may lead to collapse and/or death. HYPP is listed as a genetic defect in AQHA's rules, along with Parrot Mouth and Cryptorchid conditions
  3. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a genetic disease that causes episodes of extreme muscle weakness and an increase of the potassium levels in the blood. Muscle weakness during an attack usually affects the arms and legs and muscles of the eyes, throat, and trunk. Most often, these episodes involve a temporary inability to move muscles in the.
  4. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) in horses Quick facts. HYPP is a genetic disease noted by mild to severe episodes of muscle spasms and trembling. HYPP links back to the Quarter Horse sire Impressive. Breeders should refrain from using any HYPP horses for breeding..
  5. Periodic paralysis (PP) is a muscle disease that causes episodic muscle weakness, in the family of diseases called channelopathies [ 1 ]. It is classified as hypokalemic when episodes occur in association with low potassium blood levels or as hyperkalemic when episodes can be induced by elevated potassium

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis - an overview

Clinical Signs Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis is a genetically determined disorder which causes attacks of weakness and flaccid paralysis. Attacks last from 10 min to 1 hour, very rarely up to 1-2 days. Some patients experience only a few attacks over their lifetime, others have attacks every day. Diagnosis is suggested by attacks of weakness during which the patient's seru Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP, HyperKPP) is a genetic disorder that occurs in horses. It is also known as Impressive syndrome, after an index case in a horse named Impressive. It is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder that affects sodium channels in muscle cells and the ability to regulate potassium levels in the blood Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP) is a condition in which affected individuals may experience paralytic episodes with concomitant hypokalemia (serum potassium <3.5 mmol/L). The paralytic attacks are characterized by decreased muscle tone (flaccidity) more marked proximally than distally with normal to decreased deep tendon reflexes. The episodes develop over minutes to hours and last. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyPP) is a dominantly inherited disorder of muscle in quarter horses, American paint horses, Appaloosas, and quarter horse crossbred animals that causes episodes of tremors, myotonia, weakness, or paralysis in association with elevated serum potassium (Naylor, 1997; Spier et al., 1990). Weakness or paralysis can. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a muscle disorder that results in episodes of paralysis or muscle weakness. It is caused by a genetic defect that affects muscles cells, specifically their ability to transport sodium ions across their cell membranes, and this interferes with their ability to contract normally in response to electrical nerve.

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis FAQ Periodic Paralysis Intl

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis, Hereditary: General features. Epidemiology Prevalence: 0.1 to 1 per 100,000; .13/100,000 in United Kingdom; Similar frequency to genetically defined hyperkalemic periodic paralysis; Type Gamstorp Disease (Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis) Medically reviewed by Kevin Martinez, M.D. Gamstorp disease, also known as hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, is a rare genetic condition that. Definition. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is a disorder that causes occasional episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes a higher than normal level of potassium in the blood. The medical name for high potassium level is hyperkalemia.. HyperPP is one of a group of genetic disorders that includes hypokalemic periodic paralysis and thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Sporadic cases of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis are rare. We studied a 2-year-old girl with clinically typical hyperkalemic periodic paralysis except for a negative family history. Results of genetic and provocative testing in immediate family members suggest that hyperkalemic periodic paralysis may be genetically heterogeneous. Acetazolamide prevented attacks and improved myotonia in this. Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HyperPP) is a genetic disease that causes episodes of extreme muscle weakness and an increase of the potassium levels in the blood. Muscle weakness during an attack usually affects the arms and legs and muscles of the eyes, throat, and trunk. Most often, these episodes involve a temporary inability to move.

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis - Wikipedi

Periodic paralysis, in general, results in skeletal muscle weakness but spares muscles of respiration. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is much rarer than the hypokalemic form. If weakness is provoked by a dose of oral potassium, this would confirm hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. Acetazolamide is the treatment of choice for BOTH hyperkalemic. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a rare condition presenting as temporary periods of severe muscle weakness or paralysis. To treat this condition appropriately, it is important for clinicians to diagnosis this condition in a timely fashion and provides the patient with the appropriate care and referrals

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis Genetic and Rare Diseases

Primary Periodic Paralysis (PPP) is a group of rare, inherited neuromuscular conditions that are characterized by interference with the electrical-chemical communications between nerve cells and skeletal muscles. The major recognized forms are hyperkalemic, or high-potassium form and hypokalemic, or low-potassium form, so named because of. (See Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis and Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.) EPIDEMIOLOGY Hypokalemic PP is the most common of the periodic paralyses, but is still quite rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 100,000 [ 1 ] Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis was given its name because the veterinarians initially noted that during attacks, horses had a very high level of potassium in their blood (hyperkalemia). It seemed that horses affected with HYPP had an intrinsic, but intermittent inability to regulate potassium (so it got the name periodic), which sometimes left. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis begins in infancy and is characterized by more frequent but milder attacks that last minutes or hours; it may also be accompanied by mild myotonia (muscle spasm) of the tongue. This form of the disorder is caused by mutations in the sodium

Periodic paralysis syndrome is a group of rare muscle diseases that are inherited (genetic) from a biological parent or from a spontaneous mutation in a person's genetic makeup.; There are about seven to eight types of periodic paralysis syndromes, for example, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis or hyperPP and normokalemic periodic paralysis.; Signs and symptoms of this syndrome involve episodic. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is an inherited genetic disorder that affects both humans and horses. The disease is characterized by muscle weakness and temporary paralysis. Doctors and veterinarians treat the condition through diet and medication. Quarter horses are often afflicted with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis HyPP is an autosomal dominant trait affecting Quarter horses, American Paint horses, Appaloosas, and Quarter horse crossbreeds worldwide. The point mutation in the voltage-dependent skeletal muscle sodium channel alpha subunit occurs in ~4% of Quarter horses, but this percentage is much higher in halter and. Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis is a rare autosomal disorder that is characterised by muscle weakness or paralysis that is triggered by an increase in serum potassium. This is due to mutations in the sodium channels in the muscle in conjunction with other factors such as eating potassium rich food, stress, rest after exercise, fatigue, fasting.

Periodic Paralyses (Hyperkalemic, Hypokalemic, Andersen

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis definition at Dictionary.com, a free online dictionary with pronunciation, synonyms and translation. Look it up now A link with periodic paralysis was not considered until 1957, when French and Kilpatrick 3 studied a patient with paramyotonia who was subject to attacks of generalized weakness. An oral dose of potassium chloride induced an attack of weakness lasting several days, without a fall in the serum potassium level Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP, HyperKPP) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder that affects sodium channels in muscle cells and the ability to regulate potassium levels in the blood.It is characterized by muscle hyperexcitability or weakness which, exacerbated by potassium, heat or cold, can lead to uncontrolled shaking followed by paralysis Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is a co-dominant single autosomal gene disorder that primarily affects Quarter horses. In the muscle cells of horses with HYPP, regulation of the movement of sodium and potassium to and from cells is disrupted. Sodium channels are pores in the muscle cell membrane which control contraction of the. Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) is a dominant genetic disorder resulting from defects in sodium channels in the muscle. Affected animals experience episodes of muscular weakness or tremors, and can lead to paralysis, collapse, and sudden death

Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Periodic Paralysi

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) School of

Define hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. hyperkalemic periodic paralysis synonyms, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis pronunciation, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis translation, English dictionary definition of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. n. pl. pa·ral·y·ses 1. a. Loss or impairment of the ability to move a body part, usually as a result of. The muscle hyperkalemic periodic paralysis? Clinical and electrophysiological features of membrane thus become hyperpolarised, making it more each entity in one family. Muscle Nerve 1990;13:21-6. difficult for a stimulus to provoke an action potential Plassart E, Reboul J, Rime CS, Recan D, Millasseau P, Eymard B, et al. Mutations in the muscle sodium channel gene (SCN4A) in 13 French families with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis and paramyotonia congenita: phenotype to genotype correlations and demonstration of the predominance of two mutations

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: MedlinePlus Medical

Channels and Disease: Past, Present, and Future | Epilepsy

Definition: Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is a disorder that causes occasional episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes a higher than normal level of potassium in the blood. The medical name for high potassium level is hyperkalemia. HyperPP is one of a group of genetic disorders that includes hypokalemic periodic paralysis and. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is a dominant genetic disease most common in Quarter Horses, and which causes intermittent weakness, trembling, and sudden collapse Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a rare genetic disorder in which mutations of proteins encoding sodium channels cause sudden attacks of muscle weakness and a variable degree of paralysis that start in the first decade of life. The diagnosis can be difficult to make in the absence of a meticulous clinical and laboratory workup, including provocative tests, electromyography, muscle magnetic. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP) is an autosomal dominant human skeletal muscle channelopathy that causes periods of myotonic discharge and periodic paralysis due to defective Nav1.4 sodium channels. Patients are asymptomatic at birth, attacks become short and frequent during childhood, and more severe during adolescence

HYPERKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS; HYPP INHERITANCE - Autosomal dominant [SNOMEDCT: 263681008, 771269000] [UMLS: C0443147, C1867440 HPO: HP:0000006] [HPO: HP:0000006 UMLS: C0443147] MUSCLE, SOFT TISSUES - Flaccid weakness or paralysis, episodic attacks [UMLS: C1868434] - Muscle weakness is. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is a disorder that causes occasional episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes a higher than normal level of potassium in the blood. The medical name for high potassium level is hyperkalemia . Weakness is reduced strength in one or more muscles Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is the result of a genetic mutation in the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait; most affected horses are heterozygotes. The classical signs are muscle fasciculation, spasm, and weakness associated with hyperkalemia. However, these signs are only rarely observed in. hyperKPP means Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis. hyperKPP is an abbreviation for Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis. Search for abbreviation meaning, word to abbreviate, or category. Shortcuts for power users - examples. Abbreviation meaning - COB means. To abbreviate - Management abbreviated. Category - Medical terms Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is an autosomal dominant clinical condition where there is a mutation in gene located at 17q23 that regulates the production of protein SCN4A. Hyperkalemia-Wikipedia. The intermittent weakness seen in Andersen-Tawil syndrome also occurs in other forms of periodic paralysis - hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) Veterinary

  1. Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis Disease (HYPP) Description: Equine Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis Disease (HYPP) is a muscular disease caused by an inherited genetic mutation. HYPP has been traced back to one horse named Impressive and has the alternative name, Impressive Syndrome, named after this horse
  2. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis Also known as: adynamia episodica hereditaria, familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, Gamstorp disease, Gamstorp episodic adynamy, hyperKPP, hyperPP, primary hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. About. Description and symptoms. Communities
  3. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, also known as HYPP, is a genetically-linked muscle disease that is passed from a parent horse to a foal offspring. This disease is caused by a mutation in the sodium-channel gene which regulates muscle contractions. In horses with HYPP, the sodium channel is particularly sensitive to variations in serum.
  4. We studied mutations of the adult voltage-gated skeletal muscle sodium channel gene in 12 families, from diverse ethnic backgrounds, with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP). We describe a novel procedure, using ligase chain reaction (LCR), to simultaneously identify two different point mutations (previously described) and one rare, apparently benign polymorphism that results in a.
  5. Clinical signs are muscle fasciculations or trembling. One example is hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) caused by a defect in the skeletal muscle-sodium channel [1-5]. Other reported disorders with suspected membrane defects in horses include myotonic dystrophy and congenital myotonia [6,7]. In humans, over a dozen such disorders have been.
  6. utes to 4 hours. The attacks tend to be frequent but less severe than in other PP forms

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a disease that is characterized by episodes of intense muscle weakness and high levels of potassium in the blood. Their duration is usually 15 minutes to one hour, but some see very long episodes of multiple days to a week Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. Increased intake. Potassium supplementation. Red blood cell transfusion. Foods high in potassium* Potassium-containing salt substitutes. Protein calorie supplements Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis. Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) is a type of muscle disorder that is normally found in the American Quarter Horse breed. Initially, the disease seems has similar symptoms to other muscular disorders, but it is actually very different and is caused by a variety of factors

Her areas of interest include Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis infection (also known as pigeon fever or dryland distemper), hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, and genetic diseases of horses Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), also known as Impressive Syndrome, is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder which affects sodium channels in muscle cells and the ability to regulate potassium levels in the blood. It is most commonly associated with horses, but also occurs in humans, where it is also called Gamstorp episodic adynamy The diagnosis was normokalemic periodic paralysis, a rare genetic disorder inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. Periodic paralysis causes periodic muscle weakness, often caused by variations in serum potassium levels. Primary periodic paralysis is categorized into three types: hypokalemic PP, hyperkalemic PP, and normokalemic PP Spier and her associates reported that the disease involved was Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis, known industry-wide today by the acronym HYPP. Merely identifying the disease and the way it.

HYPP is a complex condition and we could spend a lot of time just going over the basics. So in order to devote more time to specific nutritional and management recommendations for you guys, I recommend that anyone not familiar with HYPP, or, Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis, first read my article. At the end of the article, there are specific. Alternative names : Periodic paralysis — hyperkalemic; Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis; HyperKPP; HyperPP; Gamstorp disease; Potassium-sensitiv People with hypokalemic periodic paralysis show low serum potassium levels while hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is usually associated with high potassium levels (Venance et al., 2006). The attacks of paralysis vary in frequency and strength, and can occur spontaneously but tend to be provoked by various activities or circumstances (Sternberg. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. This is a disorder where the potassium leaks into the muscle cells from the bloodstream. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. The potassium leaks out of the cells into the bloodstream. Paramyotonia congenita. This often accompanies hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, but may present alone

The hyperkalemic form of familial periodic paralysis was first described by Gamstorp in 1956. The rarest of the dyskalemic periodic paralyses, the incidence of the hyperkalemic variety has been estimated at 1:500,000. 1It is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion with a high degree of penetrance in both males and females. Attacks tend to be. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP) is an autosomal dominant muscle sodium channelopathy with nearly complete penetrance [].Tyler et al. [] first described the disease in 1951 in their study of a kindred of 7 generations of individuals with clinically typical periodic paralysis in the absence of hypokalemia.In 1957, Gamstorp extensively investigated the condition and named it adynamia. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP, HyperKPP) is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder that affects sodium channels in muscle cells and the ability to regulate potassium levels in the blood. It is characterized by muscle hyperexcitability or weakness which, exacerbated by potassium, heat or cold, can lead to uncontrolled shaking followed by paralysis. Onset usually occurs in early. Overview. Familial periodic paralysis is a disease characterized by sudden attacks of weakness and paralysis.Weakness is recurrent, affecting mainly the limbs, and is often brought on by exercising or eating too many or too few carbohydrates.[13578] There are 4 forms of familial periodic paralysis: hypokalemic, hyperkalemic, thyrotoxic, and Andersen-Tawil syndrome Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) has been recognised in Quarter Horses since the 1980s. Dr Sharon J. Spier takes an in-depth look at the syndrome since genetic testing has been available to.

Introduction. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP) is a dominantly inherited muscle disease characterized by attacks of flaccid weakness and interictal myotonia ().The incidence of HyperPP is approximately one per 200 000 persons, and its penetrance within the population is high with more than 90% ().HyperPP is a channelopathy caused by mutations in the SCN4A gene coding for the Nav1.4. Primary Periodic Paralysis is very rare, affecting about 4,000 to 5,000 diagnosed individuals in the United States. 4 Although there are related variants, the most common forms are hyperkalemic and hypokalemic PPP. 5- About Periodic Paralysis. Periodic paralyses are a group of rare hereditary disorders that cause episodes of muscle weakness or paralysis. Types of periodic paralyses are differentiated by criteria including underlying genetic mutations and changes in blood-potassium during attack. Hypokalemic and hyperkalemic are two common types of periodic.

Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP), also known as Impressive Syndrome, is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder which affects sodium channels in muscle cells and the ability to regulate potassium levels in the blood.It is most commonly associated with horses, but also occurs in humans, where it is also called Gamstorp episodic adynamy hyperkalemic paralysis: A rare form of periodic paralysis characterized by brief (1- to 2-hr) attacks of limb weakness. Respiratory muscles are involved in some cases. Hyperkalemic is misleading because the potassium levels may be normal. But, because an attack is precipitated by the administration of potassium, this form of paralysis is. Familial periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant condition with considerable variation in penetrance characterized by episodes of flaccid paralysis with loss of deep tendon reflexes and failure of muscle to respond to electrical stimulation. There are 4 forms: hypokalemic, hyperkalemic, thyrotoxic, and Andersen-Tawil syndrome

Statland JM, Fontaine B, Hanna MG, et al. Review of the diagnosis and treatment of periodic paralysis. Muscle Nerve. 2018;57:522-530. Charles G, Zheng C, Lehmann-Horn F, Jurkat-Rott K, Levitt J. Characterization of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: a survey of genetically diagnosed individuals. J Neurol. 2013;260:2606-2613 What cause Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis? It is a genetic disease in the muscles. What breed of horse (if any) is usually suffering from HYPP? and how many of them. quarter horses 4%. Where do we believe HYPP originates from? a stallion named Impressive

Gamstorp Disease (Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis

Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis • term hyperkalemic is misleading since patients are often normokalemic during attacks. • Onset first decade • M : F 1:1 • Attacks are brief and mild, usually lasting 30 minutes to 4 hours. • Weakness affects proximal muscles, sparing bulbar muscles. • Attacks are precipitated by rest following. video of a hypokalemic periodic paralysis attack. video of a hypokalemic periodic paralysis attack A broad range of topics related to Primary Periodic Paralysis are addressed within the segment, including symptoms, triggers, misdiagnosis, and genetic testing. *Exploratory study in 94 genetically diagnosed men and women ages 19-84, designed to create an evidence-based comprehensive characterization of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperPP)

Equine genetic disorders

Hypokalemic and Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis NGS Panel | Fulgent Genetics. 4978 Santa Anita Ave, Temple City, CA 91780 | P: +1 (626)350-0537 | F: +1 (626)454-1667. Hypokalemic and Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis NGS Panel http://www.theaudiopedia.com The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiop.. The Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is a hereditary muscular disease that primarily affects Quarter Horses and races related to Quarter Horses. It is characterized by sporadic episodes of muscular paralysis or very fast contractions and decontractions of the muscles (tremors). These episodes of paralysis or tremor may be accompanied by. Periodic Paralysis Definition. Periodic paralysis (PP) is the name for several rare, inherited muscle disorders marked by temporary weakness, especially following rest, sleep, or exercise.. Description. Periodic paralysis disorders are genetic disorders that affect muscle strength. There are two major forms, hypokalemic and hyperkalemic, each caused by defects in different genes

Potassium ImbalanceHypokalemic Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis With ThyrotoxicMyofibrillar Myopathy (MFM) | EquiSeq